Shipping | Basket / Checkout | Login / Account | Order Status | Contact Us | Store Locator   
Need Help Shopping? Call (877) 876-8247   
   


Acai Juice
Getting ready to try and
buy acai juice?
Watch this informative video about this popular new health drink.
FIND OUT MORE.


red yeast rice
Discover natural cholesterol control with red yeast rice extract. Don't put up with the side effects of syntheic drugs any longer.
FIND OUT MORE ABOUT RED YEAST RICE EXTRACT.


Subscribe to the Better Health News

keep up with Better Health News (and special offers) on Facebook

TOP PICKS
• Acai Juice
• Almased Synergy Diet
• Alpha-Fibe FBCx
• Astragalus
• Atkins Advantage Bars
• Atkins Day Break Bars
• Atkins Endulge
   Chocolate Bars

• Atkins Ready-To-Drink
   Shakes

• BetaGen
• Clif Bars
• Clif Luna Bars
• Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil
• Coral Calcium
• CoQ10
• EAS Myoplex Bars
• Enzymedica
• The Fiber 35 Diet
   - FitSmart Shakes
   - FitSmart Bars
   - Fiber Complex
• FruitaBu
• Fruit Leather
• Full Bar
• Gluten Free Cookies
• Gluten Free Pasta
• Kashi GoLean Cereal
• Konjac Root (Glucomannan)
• Krill Oil
• Larabar Food Bars
• The Maker's Diet
   - Primal Defense
   - Digestive Enzymes
      Complex

   - Green Food
   - Nutrition Bars
• Herbal Viagra
• Mangosteen Juice
• MET-Rx
• New Chapter
• Odwalla Energy Bars
• Organic Food Bars
• Pamelas Cookies
• Pure Protein Bars
• Red Yeast Rice Extract
• Resveratrol
• Stevia Rebaudiana
• Tom's of Maine
• Tri-O-Plex Bars
• Vitamin Code
• The Weight Loss Cure
• Wondercocoa
• Wrinkle Care Products
• Zone Perfect Bars

buy resveratrol
Before you
buy resveratrol,
be sure to watch this informative 60 minutes report about this supplement created from red wine.
FIND OUT MORE.


organic extra virgin coconut oil
Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil can actually prevent heart disease and does not raise cholesterol levels.
Find out more about Organic Extra Virgin Coconut Oil.


Stevia Rebaudiana
Stevia Rebaudiana has shown to help balance blood sugar, lower high blood pressure, reduce one's craving for sweets and fats, and "turn off" hunger sensations.
Find out more about Stevia - Stevia Rebaudiana.


Better Health News and Comment
BETTER HEALTH NEWS ARCHIVE INDEX         CURRENT NEWSLETTER INDEX

The Weight is Over: New Study Highlights the Importance of Better Doctor-Patient Communication
By Jeremy Appleton, ND

Healthnotes Newswire — People who are even slightly overweight have an increased risk of diabetes, gallstones, hypertension, high cholesterol, colon cancer, heart disease, and stroke, according to a study published in the July 12th edition in the Archives of Internal Medicine.1 The study adds to the considerable body of evidence demonstrating the health risks of being overweight and provides a wake-up call for the many Americans who are right on or right over the line separating optimal weight from overweight.

The data on women for the new study was drawn from the Nurses’ Health Study, and the data on men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Researchers found that for both sexes, the risk of developing diabetes, gallstones, hypertension, heart disease, and stroke increased proportionately to the amount they are overweight. Those participants whose Body Mass Index (BMI; see below for explanation) exceeded 35 were approximately 20 times more likely to develop diabetes than their same-sex peers whose BMI was in the optimal range (i.e., 18.5 to 24.9).

The researchers also found that adults who were overweight but not obese were over three times more likely than their thinner peers to develop diabetes over a ten-year period. Women who were overweight but not obese were about twice as likely to develop gallstones, and also had significantly increased risks of developing hypertension, high cholesterol levels, and heart disease. The results were similar for men.

Perhaps the most surprising, and distressing, finding was that adults whose weight was in the upper range of normal (BMI between 22.0 and 24.9) were more likely than their leaner counterparts to develop at least one of the aforementioned conditions. For example, adults whose BMI was in the 22.0 to 24.9 range were about twice as likely to develop diabetes, compared with adults whose BMI was under 22. Men in this same (normal) range of BMI were also about twice as likely to develop colon cancer as men whose BMI was less than 22.

Who is Overweight?

A quick and easy way to determine whether or not a person is overweight or obese is to calculate their BMI. The BMI is calculated as the weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters. For easy reference, see the following BMI chart. Several BMI calculators are also available on the Internet.2

Weight (lbs)
100
110
120
130
140
150
160
170
180
190
200
210
220
230
240
250
260
270
280
290
300
Height
5', 0"
19.5
21.5
23.4
25.4
27.3
29.3
31.2
33.2
35.1
37.1
39.1
5', 1"
18.9
20.8
22.7
24.6
26.4
28.3
30.2
32.1
34
35.9
37.8
39.7
5', 2"
18.3
20.1
21.9
23.8
25.6
27.4
29.3
31.1
32.9
34.7
36.6
38.4
40.2
5', 3"
19.5
21.3
23
24.8
26.6
28.3
30.1
31.9
33.7
35.4
37.2
39
5', 4"
18.9
20.6
22.3
24
25.7
27.5
29.2
30.9
32.6
34.3
36
37.8
39.5
5', 5"
18.3
20
21.6
23.3
25
26.6
28.3
30
31.6
33.3
24.9
36.6
38.3
39.9
5', 6"
19.4
21
22.6
24.2
25.8
27.4
29
30.7
32.3
33.9
35.5
37.1
38.7
40.3
5', 7"
18.8
20.4
21.9
23.5
25.1
26.6
28.2
29.8
31.3
32.9
34.5
36
37.6
39.2
5', 8"
19.8
21.3
22.8
24.3
25.8
27.4
28.9
30.4
31.9
33.4
35
36.5
38
39.5
5', 9"
19.2
20.7
22.1
23.6
25.1
26.6
28.1
29.5
31
32.5
34
35.4
36.9
38.4
39.9
5', 10"
18.7
20.1
21.5
23
24.4
25.8
27.3
28.7
30.1
31.6
33
34.4
35.9
37.3
38.7
40.2
5', 11"
19.5
20.9
22.3
23.7
25.1
26.5
27.9
29.3
30.7
32.1
33.5
34.9
36.3
37.7
39
6', 0"
19
20.3
21.7
23.1
24.4
25.8
27.1
28.5
29.8
31.2
32.5
33.9
35.3
36.6
38
39.3
6', 1"
18.5
19.8
21.1
22.4
23.7
25.1
26.4
27.7
29
30.3
31.7
33
34.3
35.6
36.9
38.3
39.6
6', 2"
19.3
20.5
21.8
23.1
24.4
25.7
27
28.2
29.5
30.8
32.1
33.4
34.7
35.9
37.2
38.5
6', 3"
18.7
20
21.2
22.5
23.7
25
26.2
27.5
28.7
30
31.2
32.5
33.7
35
36.2
37.5
6', 4"
19.5
20.7
21.9
23.1
24.3
25.6
26.8
28
29.2
30.4
31.6
32.9
34.1
35.3
36.5
 

Body Mass Index (BMI) is calculated as the weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters.

US Dietary Guidelines for BMI
Less than 18.5 is underweight.
18.5 to 24.9 is optimal weight.
25.0 to 29.9 is overweight.
30.0 or more is severely overweight or obese.

Prior to 1995, U.S. dietary guidelines for a normal BMI were 27.3 for women and 27.8 for men. In 1995, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services lowered the cutoff for a healthy weight to a BMI of 25.

Obesity has become a serious public health issue in the United States. According to the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 32% of adults in the United States are overweight, and another 22.5% are obese.3 These numbers continue to rise, especially among children, and the trends are expected to continue.4 The revised definition of overweight partially accounts for the increases seen in the prevalence of overweight, since a large percentage of the population has a BMI between 25 and 27. Nevertheless, the results of the new study emphasize the importance of not only maintaining normal weight, but also of achieving a more optimal weight by eating a balanced and healthful diet, and taking part in a fitness program.

References
1. Field AE, Coakley EH, Must A, et al. Impact of overweight on the risk of developing common chronic diseases during a 10-year period. Arc Intern Med 2001;161:1581–6.
2. National Heart Lung, and Blood Institute: URL: http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/bmicalc.htm; CBS Healthwatch by Medscape: URL: http://minisite.medscape.com/weight/bmi.html
3. Flegal KM, Caroll MD, Kuczmarski RJ, Johnson CL. Overweight and obesity in the United States: prevalence and trends, 1960-1994. Int J Obes 1998;22:39–47.
4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Update: prevalence of overweight among children, adolescents, and adults—United States, 1988–1994. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 1997;46:199–202.

Jeremy Appleton, ND, is a licensed naturopathic physician, writer, and educator in the field of evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine. Dr. Appleton is Chair of Nutrition at the National College of Naturopathic Medicine and Senior Science Editor at Healthnotes.




SITE INDEX | BRAND SITE INDEX | CATEGORIES | SPECIALS | BASKET | SHIPPING | ACCOUNT

POWERED BY: WWW.THEBETTERHEALTHSTORE.COM
Information presented at theBetterHealthStore.com is for educational purposes only; statements about products and health conditions have not been evaluated by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration. Copyright ©2007 theBetterHealthStore.com Inc.